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Article
January 1962

Hydrocephalus Syndrome: Obstruction of the Foramina of the Fourth Ventricle

Author Affiliations

YOUNGSTOWN, OHIO; USA; SAN FRANCISCO
Burton L. Wise, Div. of Neurological Surgery, Univ. of California School of Medicine, San Francisco 22, Calif.; From the Neurosurgical Service, Letterman Army Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco.; 501 Central Tower Building (Dr. Whitten); Neurosurgical Service, Letterman Army Hospital, Presidio of San Francisco, (Dr. Moyar); Division of Neurological Surgery, University of California School of Medicine (Dr. Wise).

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(1):55-60. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020059009
Abstract

In 1914, Dandy and Blackfan6 described an entity consisting of hydrocephalus associated with cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and absence of the posterior cerebellar vermis. In a subsequent report, Dandy5 noted that the foramina of Luschka and Magendie were absent, with resultant lack of communication between the ventricular system and the subarachnoid space.

Taggart and Walker13 contributed an excellent review of the pathology, pathogenesis, and surgical therapy of the syndrome. They considered the cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle to be due to failure of the foramina of Luschka and Magendie to open in the period of gestation before the third or fourth month. Dilatation of the fourth ventricle, occurring before the end of the fourth month, would prevent a fusion of the lateral cerebellar commissures to form the posterior vermis. (Gibson,7 however, feels that all parts of the inferior vermis are present, although they

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