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Article
March 1962

Enders' Live Measles-Virus Vaccine with Human Immune Globulin: Clinical Reactions

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; WEST POINT, PA
Joseph Stokes, Jr., M.D., The Children's Hospital, Philadelphia.; From the Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Division of Virus and Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, West Point, Pa.; Wm. H. Bennett Professor of Pediatrics, and Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Physicianin-Chief, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Stokes); Assistant Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (Dr. Weibel); Assistant Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine (Dr. Halenda); Instructor in Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Assistant Physician, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Reilly); Director, Division of Virus and Tissue Culture. Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research (Dr. Hilleman).

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):366-372. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020378037
Abstract

Measles, because of the high rate of deaths and mental crippling, stands high on the list of need for an effective vaccine. First significant progress toward development of a practicable vaccine was made by Enders et al.1 who grew the virus in various cell culture systems and in embryonated eggs and effected an attenuation of virulence for man. Although the vaccine, given alone, regularly induced antibodies against measles 2 and afforded protection against the natural disease,3,4 the mild measles reactions caused by the vaccine were sufficiently great to preclude general patient and physician acceptance.

To minimize such reactions, McCrumb et al.5 and our group 6 gave the live measlesvirus vaccine followed immediately by a modifying dose of human immune globulin. This effected a marked suppression in clinical response without reduction in seroconversion rate or in the protective efficacy of the vaccine.5-7

The present communication details the findings

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