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Article
March 1962

Immunogenic Response to Killed Measles-Virus Vaccine: Studies in Animals and Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy in an Epidemic

Author Affiliations

WEST POINT, PA.
M. R. Hilleman, Ph.D., Division of Virus & Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Theraputic Research, West Point, Pa.; From the Division of Virus & Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research, West Point, Pa., and The Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.; Director, Division of Virus & Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research (Dr. Hilleman) ; Wm. H. Bennett Professor of Pediatrics and Chairman, Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Physician-in-Chief, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Stokes) ; Research Associate, Division of Virus & Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research (Dr. Buynak) ; Instructor in Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Assistant Physician, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (Dr. Reilly) ; Associate Director, Division of Virus & Tissue Culture Research, Merck Institute for Therapeutic Research (Dr. Hampil).

Am J Dis Child. 1962;103(3):444-451. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1962.02080020456062
Abstract

The cultivation by Enders and Peebles 1 of measles virus in cell cultures of human and animal tissues has provided simplified procedures for mass propagation of the agent for experimental and vaccine purpose, for quantifying the virus, and for measurement of measles antibody in human and animal sera. Serial passage of the virus in various human cell cultures and in embryonated eggs and adaptation to growth in cell cultures of the chick embryo have made possible the development2 of a living attenuated measles-virus vaccine which is both safe and highly efficacious for preventing natural measles in man.3-5

During the early period of investigation of measles in our laboratory and prior to the demonstration of clinical efficacy of live attenuated measles vaccine in man, we undertook to prepare a killed measles-virus vaccine, to assay its antigenicity in animals and in man, and to appraise its efficacy in preventing natural

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