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Article
August 1963

Percutaneous Guide Wire Catheterization—Diagnosis and Therapy

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS
Paul R. Lurie, MD, Department of Pediatrics, Indiana University Medical Center, 1100 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis 7, Ind.; Professor of Pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine; attending pediatrician, James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Hospital for Children (Dr. Lurie); assistant professor of pediatrics, Indiana University School of Medicine; attending pediatrician, James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Hospital for Children (Dr. Armer); associate professor of radiology, Indiana University School of Medicine; attending radiologist, James Whitcomb Riley Memorial Hospital for Children; currently, professor of Radiology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn. (Dr. Klatte).; From the departments of Pediatrics, Radiology, and the Heart Research Center, Indiana University Medical Center.

Am J Dis Child. 1963;106(2):189-196. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1963.02080050191012
Abstract

Seldinger 1 in 1953 described a new method of passage of a catheter into a blood vessel without cutdown. The catheter is advanced over a guide wire which has been previously introduced through a needle. The catheter is of larger diameter than the needle, which is the paramount advantage of this method over the introduction of the catheter through the needle lumen. Since then, there have been several reports 2-6 of the use of variations of this basic technique. In a few clinics the application of the principle is routine; in others, because of certain disadvantages, there has been little interest. The object of this communication is to describe improvements which have reduced the difficulties and new applications which have increased the advantages of this basic technique. Percutaneous entry is used by choice for many purposes at the James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for Children in the fields of cardiology, urology,

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