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Article
December 1963

Time, Temperature, Exposure to Air of Milk Preparations: Effect on Fatty Acids

Author Affiliations

GALVESTON, TEX EDMUND COON, AA; OAKLAND, CALIF
Dr. Hansen died Oct 16, 1962.; Hilda F. Wiese, Bruce Lyon Memorial Research Laboratory, Children's Hospital of the East Bay, Grove and 51st St., Oakland, Calif.; The Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, Tex; the Bruce Lyon Memorial Research Laboratory, Children's Hospital of the East Bay, Oakland, Calif; The Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, Calif.; Department of Medicine, University of Texas Medical Branch (Dr. Baughan), Research Assistant, Bruce Lyon Memorial Research Laboratory, Children's Hospital of the East Bay (Mr. Coon), and Director of Research, Bruce Lyon Memorial Research Laboratory, Children's Hospital of the East Bay (Dr. Hansen).

Am J Dis Child. 1963;106(6):529-535. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1963.02080050531001
Abstract

Introduction  Recent observations 1-4 disclose that linoleic acid plays a significant role in the nu- trition of infants. Inasmuch as the majority of infants are fed prepared milk mixtures which are stored for variable periods of time before being consumed, it seemed advisable to ascertain whether time, temperature, and exposure to air influences the composition of the milk fat with respect to the degree of unsaturation. For example, the question is whether the linoleic acid content in a given milk mixture is influenced by pasteurization, boiling, terminal sterilization, warehouse storage, shelf life, refrigeration, or exposure to air in the household. It was believed that subjecting cow's milk and proprietary milk preparations to a variety of physical conditions would supply information relative to the keeping quality of the fat in milk products that are used in infant feeding.

Plan of Study  Samples of fresh whole cow's milk (raw, pasteurized, boiled, and

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