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Article
September 1964

Bacterial Interference: Protection of Adults Against Nasal Staphylococcus Aureus Infection After Colonization With a Heterologous S Aureus Strain

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK; ATLANTA; DALLAS; NEW YORK
Marvin Boris, MD, The New York Hospital, 525 E 68th St, New York, NY 10021.; Instructor, Department of Pediatrics, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center; formerly Epidemiology Branch Officer, Communicable Disease Center and Instructor, departments of preventive medicine and pediatrics, Emory University, (Dr. Boris); McAlister Professor, Department of Preventive Medicine, Emory University (Dr. Sellers); Professor and Chairman, University of Texas, Southwestern Medical School (Dr. Eichenwald); Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center (Dr. Ribble); Associate Professor, Department of Pediatrics, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center (Dr. Shinefield).; From the Department of Pediatrics, The New York Hospital-Cornell Medical Center, and the departments of preventive medicine and pediatrics, Emory University School of Medicine.

Am J Dis Child. 1964;108(3):252-261. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1964.02090010254006
Abstract

Nasal carriers of pathogenic strains of Staphylococcus aureus are a potential hazard to their environment, their contacts, and themselves. At present, there is no known method which permanently eradicates "virulent" strains of S aureus from the nose of all persistent carriers. These investigations were undertaken to evaluate a new approach to a solution of the problem presented by adult carriers of virulent staphylococci.

Shinefield and his associates have demonstrated that colonization of the nasal mucosa of newborns with one strain of coagulasepositive staphylococcus interferes with subsequent acquisition of a second strain of S aureus,1 and that, in fact, artificial colonization of newborns immediately after birth with a staphylococcus of low virulence can be employed to protect infants from infection by virulent "epidemic" strains.2-5 Epidemiologic data which would support the hypothesis of biologic competition between different strains of staphylococci have been reported by other groups of investigators.6-8

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