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Article
October 1969

Battered Child Syndrome at the Los Angeles County General Hospital

Am J Dis Child. 1969;118(4):660-667. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1969.02100040662025
Abstract

MORE THAN 20 years ago, Caffey1 reported that subdural hematomas frequently occurred in conjunction with multiple fractures of the long bones. More than ten years ago, Woolley and Evans2 suggested that such injuries to children were often not accidental but were inflicted by another individual

In 1962, Kempe et al3 described the syndrome more completely and stated, A physician needs to have a high initial level of suspicion of the diagnosis of the battered-child syndrome in instances of subdural hematoma, multiple unexplained fractures at different stages of healing, failure to thrive, when soft tissue swellings or skin bruising are present, or in any other situation where the degree and type of injury is at variance with the history given regarding its occurrence or in any child who dies suddenly.

The concern of pediatric resident physicians for the many "battered" children who were brought to the Los Angeles

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