[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.186.91. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
September 1995

Long-term Outcome of Haemophilus influenzae Meningitis in Navajo Indian Children

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester (NY) (Dr D'Angio); Department of Pediatrics and Human Development, Michigan State University, East Lansing (Dr Froehlke); Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque (Dr Plank); the Navajo Area Indian Health Service, Public Health Service (Dr Meehan and Ms Hugar); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of California, Davis (Dr Aguilar); and Department of Pediatrics, Oregon University Health Sciences Center, Portland (Dr Lande).

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149(9):1001-1008. doi:10.1001/archpedi.1995.02170220067009
Abstract

Objectives:  To determine the long-term neurologic, cognitive, and educational outcomes of Navajo children who survived Haemophilus influenzae type b meningitis.

Design:  Retrospective cohort study, with 3.6- to 15.0-year follow-up.

Setting:  Navajo Indian reservation.

Participants:  Population-based cohort of 76 Navajo children with Haemophilus meningitis at less than 5 years of age between 1975 and 1986, with 41(54%) consenting to undergo follow-up in 1990. Each case was matched to one nearest-age sibling and one unrelated age-matched control.

Main Outcome Measures:  Standardized intelligence test scores, neurologic abnormalities, and school performance.

Results:  The mean IQ for cases was lower than that for siblings (79 vs 87, P=.006) or age-matched controls (79 vs 95, P<.001). Twenty-nine percent of cases had severe neurologic sequelae, including mental retardation (24%), severe hearing loss (5%), cerebral palsy (7%), and seizure disorder (12%). Eight percent of siblings (relative risk for cases vs siblings, 8.0; P=.05) and 2% of age--matched controls (relative risk vs cases, 10.0; P=.01) had mental retardation. No siblings or age-matched controls had any other severe neurologic sequela. Twenty-nine percent of cases, 23% of siblings (relative risk, 2.5; P=.45), and 0% of age-matched controls (P=.001) required special education services, while 42% of cases, 23% of siblings (relative risk, 3.3; P=.10), and 11% of age-matched controls (relative risk, 4.0; P=.005) had been retained in a grade in school.

Conclusions:  Navajo survivors of Haemophilus meningitis suffer more long-term neurologic, cognitive, and school-related disability than siblings or age-matched controls. They may also suffer higher morbidity than Haemophilus meningitis survivors in the general population.(Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1995;149:1001-1008)

×