Trends in Competitive Venue Beverage Availability: Findings From US Secondary Schools | Adolescent Medicine | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.227.34. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Research Letter
Aug 2012

Trends in Competitive Venue Beverage Availability: Findings From US Secondary Schools

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2012;166(8):776-778. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2012.716

Competitive beverages include all beverages served or sold in schools outside of federally reimbursable meal programs.1 The Alliance for a Healthier Generation developed a set of criteria known as the School Beverage Guidelines,2 which identify approved beverage types, caloric content, and volume by school level. Approved beverages for all school levels include water, fat-free/low-fat milks, and 100% juices (approved volume and caloric content vary across grades). Additional beverages approved only for high school include no-/low-calorie beverages and drinks with up to 66 calories per 8 ounces. The Alliance guideline approval of drinks with up to 66 calories per 8 ounces currently includes the top sports drinks sold in the United States, which are classified as sugar-sweetened beverages because of added sugars.3 This article (1) uses the Alliance guidelines as a framework to present trends in competitive venue beverage availability in US secondary schools from 2006-2007 to 2010-2011 and (2) examines differences in access between middle and high school students.

×