Influencing Self-rated Health Among Adolescent Girls With Dance Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial | Adolescent Medicine | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
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Article
Comparative Effectiveness Research
January 2013

Influencing Self-rated Health Among Adolescent Girls With Dance Intervention: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Centre for Health Care Sciences (Ms Duberg and Dr Hagberg), Örebro County Council (Ms Duberg and Drs Hagberg and Möller), and Örebro University (Ms Duberg and Drs Sunvisson and Möller), Örebro, Sweden.

JAMA Pediatr. 2013;167(1):27-31. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.421
Abstract

Objective To investigate whether dance intervention influenced self-rated health for adolescent girls with internalizing problems.

Design Randomized controlled intervention trial with follow-up measures at 8, 12, and 20 months after baseline.

Setting A Swedish city with a population of 130 000.

Participants Girls aged 13 to 18 years with internalizing problems, ie, stress and psychosomatic symptoms. A total of 59 girls were randomized to the intervention group and 53 were randomized to the control group.

Intervention The intervention comprised dance classes twice weekly during 8 months. Each dance class lasted 75 minutes and the focus was on the joy of movement, not on performance.

Main Outcome Measures Self-rated health was the primary outcome; secondary outcomes were adherence to and experience of the intervention.

Results The dance intervention group improved their self-rated health more than the control group at all follow-ups. At baseline, the mean score on a 5-point scale was 3.32 for the dance intervention group and 3.75 for the control group. The difference in mean change was 0.30 (95% CI, −0.01 to 0.61) at 8 months, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.25 to 0.99) at 12 months, and 0.40 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.77) at 20 months. Among the girls in the intervention group, 67% had an attendance rate of 50% to 100%. A total of 91% of the girls rated the dance intervention as a positive experience.

Conclusions An 8-month dance intervention can improve self-rated health for adolescent girls with internalizing problems. The improvement remained a year after the intervention.

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