Bisphenol A Exposure and the Development of Wheeze and Lung Function in Children Through Age 5 Years | Allergy and Clinical Immunology | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.186.91. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Original Investigation
December 2014

Bisphenol A Exposure and the Development of Wheeze and Lung Function in Children Through Age 5 Years

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Pediatrics, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania
  • 2Department of Public Health Sciences, Penn State University Hershey Medical Center, Hershey, Pennsylvania
  • 3currently with the Department of Pediatrics, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore
  • 4Department of Pediatrics, Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio
  • 5Division of Laboratory Sciences, National Center for Environmental Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia
  • 6Child and Family Research Institute, British Columbia Children’s Hospital and Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada
JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(12):1131-1137. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.1397
Abstract

Importance  Bisphenol A (BPA), a prevalent endocrine-disrupting chemical, has been associated with wheezing in children, but few studies have examined its effect on lung function or wheeze in older children.

Objectives  To test whether BPA exposure is associated with lung function, with wheeze, and with pattern of wheeze in children during their first 5 years.

Design, Setting, and Participants  A birth cohort study, enrolled during early pregnancy in the greater Cincinnati, Ohio, area among 398 mother-infant dyads. We collected maternal urine samples during pregnancy (at 16 and 26 weeks) and child urine samples annually to assess gestational and child BPA exposure.

Main Outcomes and Measures  We assessed parent-reported wheeze every 6 months for 5 years and measured child forced expiratory volume in the first second of expiration (FEV1) at age 4 and 5 years. We evaluated associations of BPA exposure with respiratory outcomes, including FEV1, child wheeze, and wheeze phenotype.

Results  Urinary BPA concentrations and FEV1 data were available for 208 children and urinary BPA concentrations and parent-reported wheeze data were available for 360 children. The mean maternal urinary BPA concentration ranged from 0.53 to 293.55 µg/g of creatinine. In multivariable analysis, every 10-fold increase in the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was associated with a 14.2% (95% CI, −24.5% to −3.9%) decrease in the percentage predicted FEV1 at 4 years, but no association was found at 5 years. In multivariable analysis, every 10-fold increase in the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was marginally associated with a 54.8% increase in the odds of wheezing (adjusted odds ratio, 1.55; 95% CI, 0.91-2.63). While the mean maternal urinary BPA concentration was not associated with wheeze phenotype, a 10-fold increase in the 16-week maternal urinary BPA concentration was associated with a 4.27-fold increase in the odds of persistent wheeze (adjusted odds ratio, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.37-13.30). Child urinary BPA concentrations were not associated with FEV1 or wheeze.

Conclusions and Relevance  These results provide evidence suggesting that prenatal but not postnatal exposure to BPA is associated with diminished lung function and the development of persistent wheeze in children.

×