Influence of Attendance at Day Care on the Common Cold From Birth Through 13 Years of Age | Infectious Diseases | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.186.91. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
February 2002

Influence of Attendance at Day Care on the Common Cold From Birth Through 13 Years of Age

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Pediatrics (Drs Ball, Holberg, Aldous, Martinez, and Wright), Respiratory Sciences Center (Drs Holberg, Martinez, and Wright), and Steele Memorial Children's Research Center, University of Arizona College of Medicine (Drs Ball, Holberg, Aldous, Martinez, and Wright), Tucson.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2002;156(2):121-126. doi:10.1001/archpedi.156.2.121
Abstract

Objective  To describe trends in the occurrence of the common cold during the first 13 years of life among children who attended different childcare settings early in life.

Design  The Tucson Children's Respiratory Study involves 1246 children enrolled at birth and followed up prospectively since May 1980 through October 1984. Children with data regarding day care use during the first 3 years of life were included in this investigation (n = 991). Parents reported the occurrence of frequent (≥4) colds during the past year by questionnaire when each child was 2, 3, 6, 8, 11, and 13 years of age. Child care at home (no unrelated children), at small day care (1-5 unrelated children), or at large day care (≥6 unrelated children) was reported retrospectively by parental questionnaire when the children were approximately 6 years old.

Results  After adjusting for potential confounding variables, compared with children at home those in large day care had more frequent colds at year 2 (odds ratio [OR], 1.9, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.0-3.4; P = .04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-0.9; P = .02) through 11 (OR, 0.4, 95% CI, 0.1-1.2; P = .09), and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR,1.0, 95% CI, 0.3-3.8; P = .95). In addition, compared with children in large day care for 1 year or less those attending large day care for more than 2 years had more frequent colds at year 2 (OR, 1.7, 95% CI, 1.0-3.0; P = .04), less frequent colds at years 6 (OR, 0.5, 95% CI, 0.2-1.1; P = .08), 8 (OR, 0.2, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P = .04), and 11 (OR, 0.3, 95% CI, 0.1-1.0; P = .05); and the same odds of frequent colds at year 13 (OR, 0.9, 95% CI, 0.3-2.9; P = .80).

Conclusions  Attendance at large day care was associated with more common colds during the preschool years. However, it was found to protect against the common cold during the early school years, presumably through acquired immunity. This protection waned by 13 years of age.

×