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In This Issue of JAMA Pediatrics
April 2019

Highlights

JAMA Pediatr. 2019;173(4):303. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.3489

Research

Leddy and colleagues conducted a randomized clinical trial of 103 adolescents and found that those assigned to aerobic exercise recovered faster (13 days) than those assigned to placebo-like stretching (17 days), which was a significant difference.

Editorial

Continuing Medical Education

Polonsky and colleagues conducted a cluster randomized clinical trial of 1362 students in urban schools who participated in the federal School Breakfast Program to evaluate the effects of providing breakfast in the classroom at the beginning of the school day vs in the cafeteria before school on the weight status of low-income, urban fourth- through sixth-grade children. They found no benefit in terms of overweight and obesity and an increased prevalence of obesity 2.5 years later in the breakfast group.

Editorial

Vergunst and colleagues conducted a 30-year follow-up study examining the association between kindergarten teacher–rated behavioral assessments of boys in low-socioeconomic neighborhoods with subsequent adulthood employment earnings at age 35 to 36 years. They found that kindergarten teachers’ ratings of inattention were associated with lower earnings at age 35 to 36 years and prosocial behavior, with higher earnings after adjustment for child IQ and family adversity. Hyperactivity, opposition, and aggression were not associated with earnings.

Kuppermann and colleagues conducted a cohort study of 1821 febrile infants 60 days and younger in which 170 (9.3%) had serious bacterial infections. Using a recursive partitioning analysis, they derived a low-risk prediction rule involving 3 variables: normal urinalysis, an absolute neutrophil count of 4090/μL or less, and serum procalcitonin levels of 1.71 ng/mL or less. The rule sensitivity was 97.7%, specificity was 60.0%, and the negative predictive value was 99.6%; no infant with bacterial meningitis was missed.

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