Adolescent Screen Time and Attachment to Parents and Peers | Adolescent Medicine | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.204.186.91. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
March 1, 2010

Adolescent Screen Time and Attachment to Parents and Peers

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Cancer Society Social and Behavioural Research Unit (Drs Richards and McGee) and Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Research Unit (Drs Richards, Welch, and Hancox), Department of Preventive and Social Medicine (Drs Richards, McGee, Williams, and Hancox), Dunedin Medical School, University of Otago, Dunedin, and School of Population Health, University of Auckland, Auckland (Dr Welch), New Zealand.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(3):258-262. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2009.280
Abstract

Objective  To examine associations between screen time (television, video or DVD, gaming, and computer use) and attachment to parents and peers in 2 cohorts of adolescents 16 years apart.

Design  Cross-sectional data regarding screen time and attachment to parents and peers were collected for 2 cohorts of adolescents, one in 1987-1988 (the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study [DMHDS] cohort) and the other in 2004 (the Youth Lifestyle Study [YLS] cohort).

Setting  Members of the DMHDS cohort were interviewed as part of a full day of assessment, and members of the YLS cohort completed a self-report questionnaire in a supervised classroom setting.

Participants  The DMHDS cohort (n = 976) was aged 15 years in 1987-1988. The YLS cohort (n = 3043) was aged 14 to 15 years in 2004.

Main Outcome Measures  Screen time and low attachment to parents and peers as measured by the Inventory of Parent and Peer Attachment.

Results  More time spent television viewing and less time spent reading and doing homework were associated with low attachment to parents for both cohorts. Among the YLS cohort, more time spent playing on a computer was also associated with low attachment to parents. Among the DMHDS cohort, more time spent television viewing was associated with low attachment to peers.

Conclusions  Screen time was associated with poor attachment to parents and peers in 2 cohorts of adolescents 16 years apart. Given the importance of attachment to parents and peers in adolescent health and development, concern about high levels of screen time among adolescents is warranted.

×