Infant Media Exposure and Toddler Development | Child Development | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
[Skip to Navigation]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.227.34. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
Article
December 6, 2010

Infant Media Exposure and Toddler Development

Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations: Department of Pediatrics, New York University School of Medicine–Bellevue Hospital Center (Drs Tomopoulos, Dreyer, Berkule, Fierman, Brockmeyer, and Mendelsohn), and Department of Psychology, Manhattanville College, Purchase (Dr Berkule), New York.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2010;164(12):1105-1111. doi:10.1001/archpediatrics.2010.235
Abstract

Objective  To determine whether duration and content of media exposure in 6-month-old infants are associated with development at age 14 months.

Design  Longitudinal analysis of 259 mother-infant dyads participating in a long-term study related to early child development, from November 23, 2005, through January 14, 2008.

Setting  An urban public hospital.

Participants  Mothers with low socioeconomic status and their infants.

Main Exposure  Duration and content of media exposure at age 6 months.

Main Outcome Measures  Cognitive and language development at age 14 months.

Results  Of 259 infants, 249 (96.1%) were exposed to media at age 6 months, with mean (SD) total exposure of 152.7 (124.5) min/d. In unadjusted and adjusted analyses, duration of media exposure at age 6 months was associated with lower cognitive development at age 14 months (unadjusted: r = −0.17, P < .01; adjusted: β = −0.15, P = .02) and lower language development (r = −0.16, P < .01; β = −0.16, P < .01). Of 3 types of content assessed, only 1 (older child/adult–oriented) was associated with lower cognitive and language development at age 14 months. No significant associations were seen with exposure to young child–oriented educational or noneducational content.

Conclusions  This study is the first, to our knowledge, to have longitudinally assessed associations between media exposure in infancy and subsequent developmental outcomes in children from families with low socioeconomic status in the United States. Findings provide strong evidence in support of the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendations of no media exposure prior to age 2 years, although further research is needed.

×