Antismoking Parenting Practices Are Associated With Reduced Rates of Adolescent Smoking | Adolescent Medicine | JAMA Pediatrics | JAMA Network
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Article
April 2004

Antismoking Parenting Practices Are Associated With Reduced Rates of Adolescent Smoking

Author Affiliations

From the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center (Drs Andersen, Leroux, and Peterson and Messers Bricker and Rajan), and the Departments of Health Services (Dr Andersen), Biostatistics (Drs Leroux and Peterson), and Psychology (Mr Bricker), University of Washington, Seattle.

Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2004;158(4):348-352. doi:10.1001/archpedi.158.4.348
Abstract

Background  Although parental smoking is clearly one important influence on children's smoking, it is still unclear what are the many mechanisms by which parents influence their children's smoking. Antismoking actions are one potential mechanism.

Objective  To determine whether parental antismoking actions including having rules about smoking in one's home, using nonsmoking sections of public establishments, or asking others not to smoke in one's presence are associated with adolescents' adoption of smoking.

Design  A cross-sectional survey.

Setting  Rural and suburban communities in western Washington State.

Participants  Population-based cohort of 3555 adolescents and their parents.

Main Outcome Measure  Daily smoking in 12th grade.

Results  Adolescents of parents who report having rules about smoking in one's home, using nonsmoking sections of public establishments, or asking others not to smoke in one's presence were significantly less likely to smoke than adolescents of parents who did not engage in antismoking actions. This association of antismoking action and reduced smoking was found for children of both smoking and nonsmoking parents.

Conclusion  Parents' antismoking actions may help prevent smoking by their teenaged children.

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