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September 2017 - January 1911

Decade

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Issue

May 2014, Vol 168, No. 5, Pages 397-500 | Media, Technology, and Pediatric Health

In This Issue of JAMA Pediatrics

Highlights

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):397. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3339
Viewpoint

Interactive Media Use at Younger Than the Age of 2 YearsTime to Rethink the American Academy of Pediatrics Guideline?

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):399-400. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.5081

Families, Pediatricians, and the Challenges of Digital KidsThe Best of Times?

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):401-402. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.151
On My Mind

Anthony’s Story

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):403. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.154
Editorial

Moving From Child Advocacy to Evidence-Based Care for Digital Natives

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):404-406. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.55
Original Investigation

Journal Club

Effects of a Pediatric Weight Management Program With and Without Active Video GamesA Randomized Trial

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):407-413. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3436

Trost et al evaluate the effects of active video gaming on physical activity and weight loss in children participating in an evidence-based weight management program delivered in the community.

Parental Monitoring of Children’s Media ConsumptionThe Long-term Influences on Body Mass Index in Children

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):414-421. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.5483

Tiberio et al examine the potential influences of maternal and paternal monitoring of child media exposure and children’s general activities on body mass index in middle childhood.

Children’s Reaction to Depictions of Healthy Foods in Fast-Food Television Advertisements

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):422-426. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.140

Bernhardt et al determine how children interpreted depictions of milk and apples in television advertisements for children’s meals by McDonald’s and Burger King.

Association of a Television in the Bedroom With Increased Adiposity Gain in a Nationally Representative Sample of Children and Adolescents

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):427-434. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3921

Gilbert-Diamond et al assess the prospective association between a bedroom television and change in body mass index, independent of television viewing, in a nationally representative sample of US children and adolescents.

Relationship Between Peer Victimization, Cyberbullying, and Suicide in Children and AdolescentsA Meta-analysis

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):435-442. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4143

van Geel et al examine the relationship between peer victimization and suicidal ideation or suicide attempts in children and adolescents.

Googling Self-injuryThe State of Health Information Obtained Through Online Searches for Self-injury

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):443-449. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.187

Lewis and colleagues use Google to examine and evaluate the scope and quality of health-information websites retrieved from NSSI search terms.

Mediators and Moderators of Long-term Effects of Violent Video Games on Aggressive BehaviorPractice, Thinking, and Action

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):450-457. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.63

Gentile et al aim to determine whether cognitive and/or emotional variables mediate the effect of violent video game play on aggression and whether the effect is moderated by age, sex, prior aggressiveness, or parental monitoring.

Hours of Television Viewing and Sleep Duration in ChildrenA Multicenter Birth Cohort Study

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):458-464. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3861

Marinelli et al examined the association between hours of television viewing and sleep duration in preschool and school-aged children. They performed a longitudinal, multicenter study among birth cohorts in Menorca, Sabadell, and Valencia counties from the Spanish Infancia y Medio Ambiente (environment and childhood) project.

Bidirectional Relationships Between Sleep Duration and Screen Time in Early Childhood

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):465-470. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.4183

In a cohort study, Magee and coauthors examine whether bidirectional relationships exist between sleep duration and media use among a representative sample of 3427 Australian children obtained from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, and whether these associations are moderated by child- and household-related factors.

Effect of Short Message Service on Infant Feeding PracticeFindings From a Community-Based Study in Shanghai, China

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):471-478. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.58

Jiang et al assessed the effect of a short message service (SMS) intervention on infant feeding practices using a quasiexperimental design with follow-up measures at 4, 6, and 12 months at 4 community health centers. Mothers in the intervention group received weekly SMS messages about infant feeding from the third trimester to 12 months’ post partum.

Protective Effects of Parental Monitoring of Children’s Media UseA Prospective Study

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):479-484. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.146

Gentile and colleagues determine the prospective effects of parental monitoring of children’s media on physical, social, and academic outcomes.

Early Childhood Electronic Media Use as a Predictor of Poorer Well-beingA Prospective Cohort Study

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):485-492. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2014.94

Hinkley et al investigate the possible dose-response associations of young children’s electronic media use with their later well-being.

JAMA Pediatrics Clinical Challenge

Boy With Yellow-Orange, Rough Nodule on Right Thigh

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):493-494. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3979
JAMA Pediatrics Patient Page

Cyberbullying

Abstract Full Text
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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):500. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3343
JAMA Pediatrics Masthead

JAMA Pediatrics

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JAMA Pediatr. 2014;168(5):398. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2013.3340
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