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Comment & Response
March 6, 2019

Autism Risk and Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychiatry, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 2Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 3Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden
  • 4Department of Preventive Medicine, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
  • 5Mindich Child Health and Development Institute, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York
JAMA Psychiatry. 2019;76(5):548-549. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.0081

In Reply We thank Anderson for carefully reviewing our work1 and taking time to share his concerns about the classification of pseudoephedrine together with other medications that inhibit the reuptake of serotonin. We underscore that this classification is correct per 2 reputable pharmacological resources exploited in our article, DrugBank.ca2 and PubChem.com.3 Nevertheless, we also fully acknowledge that the medication is reported to have weak affinity to serotonin transporter.4 Although our method entailed inclusion of drugs with different affinities for any one target, below we explain how this impacted our findings and outline potential extensions of our method related to Anderson’s letter.

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