[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Views 1,028
Citations 0
Original Investigation
April 10, 2019

Effect of Developmentally Adapted Cognitive Processing Therapy for Youth With Symptoms of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After Childhood Sexual and Physical Abuse: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Psychology, Catholic University Eichstätt-Ingolstadt, Eichstätt, Germany
  • 2Hochschule Döpfer, University of Applied Sciences, Research Centre, University of Applied Sciences, Köln, Germany
  • 3Psychiatric University Hospital Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany
  • 4Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Institute of Psychology, Goethe University Frankfurt, Frankfurt am Main, Germany
  • 5Freelance researcher in München, Germany
  • 6Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Freie Universitaet of Berlin, Berlin, Germany
JAMA Psychiatry. 2019;76(5):484-491. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2018.4349
Key Points

Question  Is developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy more effective than a wait-list condition with treatment advice in adolescents and young adults with posttraumatic stress disorder related to childhood sexual and/or physical abuse?

Findings  In a multicenter, randomized clinical trial of 88 participants (aged 14-21 years), developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy resulted in greater improvement in blinded, rater-assessed posttraumatic stress disorder severity and in self-reported secondary outcomes than a wait-list condition with treatment advice. Treatment success was greatest during the trauma-focused core phase and remained stable to the 3-month follow-up.

Meaning  Developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy is more effective than a wait-list condition with treatment advice and well tolerated in adolescents and young adults with abuse-related posttraumatic stress disorder.

Abstract

Importance  Despite the high prevalence, evidence-based treatments for abuse-related posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in adolescents have rarely been studied.

Objective  To examine whether developmentally adapted cognitive processing therapy (D-CPT) is more effective than a wait-list condition with treatment advice (WL/TA) among adolescents with PTSD related to childhood abuse.

Design, Setting, and Participants  This rater-blinded, multicenter, randomized clinical trial (stratified by center) enrolled treatment-seeking adolescents and young adults (aged 14-21 years) with childhood abuse–related PTSD at 3 university outpatient clinics in Germany from July 2013 to June 2015, with the last follow-up interview conducted by May 2016. Of 194 patients, 88 were eligible for randomization.

Interventions  Participants received D-CPT or WL/TA. Cognitive processing therapy was enhanced by a motivational and alliance-building phase, by including emotion regulation and consideration of typical developmental tasks, and by higher session frequency in the trauma-focused core CPT phase. In WL/TA, participants received treatment advice with respective recommendations of clinicians and were offered D-CPT after 7 months.

Main Outcomes and Measures  All outcomes were assessed before treatment (baseline), approximately 8 weeks after the start of treatment, after the end of treatment (posttreatment), and at the 3-month follow-up. The primary outcome, PTSD symptom severity, was assessed in clinical interview (Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for Children and Adolescents for DSM-IV [CAPS-CA]). Secondary outcomes were self-reported PTSD severity, depression, borderline symptoms, behavior problems, and dissociation.

Results  The 88 participants (75 [85%] female) had a mean age of 18.1 years (95% CI, 17.6-18.6 years). In the intention-to-treat analysis, the 44 participants receiving D-CPT (39 [89%] female) demonstrated greater improvement than the 44 WL/TA participants (36 [82%] female) in terms of PTSD severity (mean CAPS-CA scores, 24.7 [95% CI, 16.6-32.7] vs 47.5 [95% CI, 37.9-57.1]; Hedges g = 0.90). This difference was maintained through the follow-up (mean CAPS-CA scores, 25.9 [95% CI, 16.2-35.6] vs 47.3 [95% CI, 37.8-56.8]; Hedges g = 0.80). Treatment success was greatest during the trauma-focused core phase. The D-CPT participants also showed greater and stable improvement in all secondary outcomes, with between-groups effect sizes ranging from 0.65 to 1.08 at the posttreatment assessment (eg, for borderline symptoms, 14.1 [95% CI, 8.0-20.2] vs 32.0 [95% CI, 23.8-40.2]; Hedges g = 0.91).

Conclusions and Relevance  Adolescents and young adults with abuse-related PTSD benefited more from D-CPT than from WL/TA. Treatment success was stable at the follow-up and generalized to borderline symptoms and other comorbidities.

Trial Registration  German Clinical Trials Register identifier: DRKS00004787

×