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Comment & Response
July 10, 2019

Considering the Source of Information in the Evaluation of Maltreatment Experiences—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Division of Psychology and Language Sciences, Department of Clinical, Educational and Health Psychology, University College London, London, United Kingdom
  • 2Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
  • 3Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King’s College London, London, United Kingdom
  • 4National and Specialist CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Services) Trauma, Anxiety, and Depression Clinic, South London and Maudsley NHS (National Health Service) Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom
JAMA Psychiatry. 2019;76(9):985-986. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2019.1685

In Reply We thank Goltermann et al for their thoughtful Letter in response to our meta-analysis showing low agreement between prospective and retrospective measures of childhood maltreatment.1 Goltermann et al are interested in the reasons for such low agreement. As highlighted in the Discussion section of our article,1 we agree that low agreement may be partly attributable to methodological differences between prospective and retrospective measures.

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