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Article
December 1959

Effect of Meprobamate on Stimulus Generalization Under Experimental Stress

Author Affiliations

Dallas, Texas
From the Division of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical School; and the Department of Psychiatry, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.
Present address (Dr. Wolff): Aero Medical Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio.

AMA Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1959;1(6):630-633. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1959.03590060092009
Abstract

The widespread use of meprobamate and other ataractics in clinical practice is essentially based on the assumption that these drugs decrease the deleterious effects of what generally has been referred to as anxiety. Perhaps most necessary to research in this area is a controlled test of the assumption which underlies the administration of the ataractics. A survey of the available literature indicates that research with socalled tranquilizers has been primarily concerned with either the clinical effectiveness or the physiological and psychological untoward effects of the drugs,1,4-6,10 but not directly with tests of this critical assumption.

While it is well established that clinical studies are valuable and vital in the accumulation of data for drug evaluations, it is also apparent that the interpretation of many of these data is limited and unclear because of serious methodological shortcomings. For example, in dealing with

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