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Article
July 1960

Sedation and Tranquilization: A Comparison of the Effects of a Number of Psychopharmacologic Agents upon Normal Human Subjects

Author Affiliations

Bethesda, Md. Boston
From the Psychopharmacology Research Project, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, and the Department of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Supported by funds from Bristol Laboratory, Inc., Sracuse, N.Y., and Grant MY-2726, U.S. Public Health Service, Bethesda, Md. based in part on a paper presented before the Boston Society of Neurology and Psychiatry, April 16, 1959, Boston.
Dr. Klerman was formerly Chief of Service, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, and Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School; currently, Senior Assistant Surgeon (Res.), U.S. Public Health Service; Research Psychiatrist, Psychopharmacology Service Center, Research Grants & Fellowships Branch, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service, U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, Bethesda, Md. Principal Investigator, Psychopharmacology Research Project, Massachusetts Mental Health Center, Boston (Mr. DiMascio). Senior Physician, Massacusetts Mental Health Center, and Instructor in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School (Dr. Havens). Resident Psychiatrist, massachusetts Mental Health Center, and Teaching Fellow in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School (Dr. Snell).

Arch Gen Psychiatry. 1960;3(1):4-13. doi:10.1001/archpsyc.1960.01710010016002
Abstract

The introduction of chlorpromazine and reserpine as therapeutic agents has given great impetus to the field of psychopharmacology. The subsequent rapid development of other new drugs has increased the need for improved techniques of assessing drug effects and for investigations of the mechanisms of their action.

The diverse and complex actions of these agents has, in addition, resulted in new terminologies and concepts. "Tranquilizer," "psychic normalizer," "ataractic," "neuroleptic," and "psychic energizer" are among the new terms introduced. These new terms have become very popular; many have even

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