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June 2018 - July 1959

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Issue

January 2015, Vol 72, No. 1, Pages 1-96

In This Issue of JAMA Psychiatry

Highlights

Abstract Full Text
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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):1. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1858
Editorial

The Tradition and Future of JAMA Psychiatry

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):3-4. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2613
Original Investigation

Antipsychotic Treatment and Functional Connectivity of the Striatum in First-Episode Schizophrenia

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):5-13. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1734

This prospective controlled study reports that corticostriatal functional dysconnectivity in psychosis is a state-dependent phenomenon. Increased functional connectivity of the striatum with prefrontal and limbic regions may be a biomarker for improvement in symptoms associated with antipsychotic treatment.

Initial Severity of Schizophrenia and Efficacy of AntipsychoticsParticipant-Level Meta-analysis of 6 Placebo-Controlled Studies

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):14-21. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2127

This meta-analysis of 6 placebo-controlled studies examines whether the baseline severity of schizophrenia influences the efficacy of antipsychotic drugs.

Problem Adaptation Therapy for Older Adults With Major Depression and Cognitive ImpairmentA Randomized Clinical Trial

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):22-30. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1305

This randomized clinical trial reports that problem adaptation therapy was more efficacious than supportive therapy for cognitively impaired patients in reducing depression and disability. Problem adaptation therapy may provide relief to a large group of depressed and cognitively impaired older adults with few treatment options.

Depression Outcomes Associated With an Intervention Implemented in Employment Training Programs for Low-Income Adolescents and Young Adults

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):31-39. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2022

This quasi-experimental study shows that a mental health intervention integrated into an employment training program can reduce depressive symptoms and improve engaged coping strategies in adolescents and young adults.

Anterior Insula Volume and GuiltNeurobehavioral Markers of Recurrence After Early Childhood Major Depressive Disorder

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):40-48. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1604

This prospective longitudinal study provides evidence that structural abnormalities in anterior insula volume are related to the neurobiology of depressive disorders starting in early childhood.

Predicting Suicides After Psychiatric Hospitalization in US Army SoldiersThe Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):49-57. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1754

This US Army study found a high concentration of risk of suicide and other adverse outcomes among soldiers after psychiatric hospitalization.

Telemedicine-Based Collaborative Care for Posttraumatic Stress DisorderA Randomized Clinical Trial

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):58-67. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1575

This pragmatic effectiveness trial finds that telemedicine-based collaborative care can successfully engage rural veterans in evidence-based psychotherapy to improve outcomes of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Predicting Treatment Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Panic Disorder With Agoraphobia by Integrating Local Neural Information

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):68-74. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1741

This longitudinal study determines that response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) can be predicted on an individual-patient level based on functional neuroimaging data in panic disorder and agoraphobia.

Trends in Subthreshold Psychiatric Diagnoses for Youth in Community Treatment

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):75-83. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1746

This retrospective quantification and assessment of temporal patterns of DSM-IV diagnoses not otherwise specified among youth finds that subthreshold diagnoses have expanded, a trend that will continue in the DSM-5 era.

Comorbidity and Continuity of Psychiatric Disorders in Youth After DetentionA Prospective Longitudinal Study

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):84-93. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1375

This prospective longitudinal study shows that, although prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity decreased in youth after detention, rates remained substantial and were higher than rates in the most comparable studies of the general population.

Comment & Response

Association Among Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Adverse Birth Outcomes, and Domestic Violence

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):94. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1619

Ketamine for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

Abstract Full Text
JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):94-95. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1621

Ketamine for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder—Reply

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):95-96. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1751
Correction

Typographical Error in Text

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):96. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2720

Error in Figure

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):96. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2776

Incorrect Value in Table 2

Abstract Full Text
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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):96. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2875

Incorrect Sentences in Abstract

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):96. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.2955
JAMA Psychiatry Masthead

JAMA Psychiatry

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JAMA Psychiatry. 2015;72(1):2. doi:10.1001/jamapsychiatry.2014.1859
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