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Comment & Response
September 29, 2021

Looking Over the Drape—Anesthesiologists’ Volume and Surgical Outcomes—Reply

Author Affiliations
  • 1Department of Surgery, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 2Division of General Surgery, Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 3Clinical Evaluative Sciences, Sunnybrook Research Institute, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 4ICES, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 5Institute of Health Policy, Measurement, and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 6Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
  • 7Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
JAMA Surg. 2022;157(1):79. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2021.3756

In Reply While volume-outcome associations in surgical cancer care have been extensively studied for surgeon and institutions, other components of perioperative care have rarely been examined through the volume-outcome lens. In a population-based cohort study,1 we observed that patients undergoing complex gastrointestinal cancer surgery (esophagectomy, hepatectomy, or pancreatectomy) cared for by high-volume anesthesiologists had 15% lower odds of combined 90-day major morbidity, mortality, or readmission.

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