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Article
January 1922

STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL TRAUMATIC SHOCKIV. EVIDENCE OF A TOXIC FACTOR IN WOUND SHOCK

Arch Surg. 1922;4(1):1-22. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110100010001
Abstract

During the last four years, clinical observations and laboratory studies have added materially to our knowledge of wound shock. Summarizing old and new features of this condition it may be said that it is characterized by a low venous pressure,1 a low or falling arterial pressure, a rapid thready pulse, a diminished blood volume, 2 a normal or increased erythrocyte count and hemoglobin percentage in peripheral blood, 3 a leukocytosis, 4 an increased blood nitrogen, 5 a reduced blood alkali, 6 a lowered metabolism, 7 a subnormal temperature, a cold skin, moist with sweat, a pallid or grayish or slightly cyanotic appearance, by thirst, by rapid respiration, often by vomiting and restlessness, and by anxiety, changing to mental dulness and lessened sensitivity. Many of these features may appear at once or as soon after the reception of the wound as the observations can be made; or they may develop

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