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Article
May 1922

COMPARATIVE RESULTS OF THE LIGATION OF THE HEPATIC ARTERY IN ANIMALS: ITS APPLICATION TO MAN

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA; NORRISTOWN, PA.

Arch Surg. 1922;4(3):661-679. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1922.01110120178007
Abstract

In a preliminary report1 the reason for this study was pointed out to be an injury of the hepatic artery sustained by a boy, aged 12 years, who was run over by a wagon, the wheels passing over the epigastric region. He had all the symptoms of an internal hemorrhage. At operation, the hepatic artery was found to be severed. Both ends of the artery were tied. The boy did well until the tenth day, when he developed a slight jaundice, accompanied by vomiting. He died on the fourteenth day, of symptoms resembling acute yellow atrophy of the liver. A postmortem examination was refused. Our desire to duplicate this injury in animals has developed these experiments.

In our preliminary studies, rabbits were used exclusively; but in our later experiments, dogs, cats, guinea-pigs and rabbits were employed. These animals may be divided into the carnivorous and herbivorous types. We found

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