[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 34.226.244.70. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1923

STUDIES IN EXPERIMENTAL TRAUMATIC SHOCK: VIII. THE INFLUENCE OF MORPHIN ON THE BLOOD PRESSURE AND ALKALI RESERVE IN TRAUMATIC SHOCK

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Laboratories of Physiology, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1923;7(1):96-110. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1923.01120010099006
Abstract

Morphin was used extensively in the treatment of the wounded during the recent war, and at the present time it is almost routinely employed by many surgeons preparatory to operative procedures in civilian practice. The experiments herein reported were made in an attempt to determine the influence of morphin on the development of shock. The problem was studied from the point of view of a possible influence on the blood pressure and on the carbon dioxid capacity of the blood. Most of the observations were made at the Central Medical Department Laboratory, Dijon, France, during the summer of 1918. Preliminary reports1 have already been published, since which time a number of other articles have been added to the literature on the subject, and it seems worth while to present the results of these experiments in more detail.

THE EFFECT OF MORPHIN ON THE BLOOD PRESSURE 

Literature.  —The early work

×