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Article
November 1924

STUDIES IN ASEPTIC INTESTINAL ANASTOMOSIS: II. AN ASEPTIC METHOD OF END-TO-END INTESTINAL ANASTOMOSIS BY THE INVAGINATION OF THE LIGATED BLIND ENDS OF THE INTESTINES TO FORM DIGESTIBLE BOLI, RELEASE OF WHICH REESTABLISHES THE CONTINUITY OF THE INTESTINAL LUMEN

Author Affiliations

EVANSTON, ILL.
From the Otho S. A. Sprague Memorial Institute Laboratory of the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1924;9(3):530-536. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1924.01120090047004
Abstract

The present method of aseptic intestinal anastomosis was developed to eliminate the objectionable use of any special instrument or mechanical device which must be either withdrawn through the line of suture before the final closure or passed out of the intestines by peristalsis or otherwise. Also complications, such as postoperative adhesions and infection, are still important problems consequent to the open suture of the intestine. The following, quoted from Dr. William Stewart Halsted,1 emphasizes this factor: "Soiling unquestionably contributes to the mortality attending the circular suture, particularly of the large bowel, but how important this factor is cannot be definitely determined until it shall have been completely eliminated."

HISTCRICAL REVIEW  Many mechanical devices, knives, clamps, buttons, release sutures, etc., have been described from time to time. These have been enumerated in an article that was published by myself in collaboration with Dr. William B. McClure2 in 1922. Since

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