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Article
January 1926

THE RECURRENT LARYNGEAL NERVES IN DOGS: EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES

Arch Surg. 1926;12(1):95-116. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1926.01130010099003
Abstract

The recurrent laryngeal nerve is in many respects ideal for the study of nerve regeneration, either spontaneous or that which occurs after suture. The intrinsic muscles of the larynx are supplied by the recurrent and the superior laryngeal nerves, and in the anesthetized dog any change in the involuntary movements of the vocal cords that may result from experimental lesions to either or both of these nerves may be observed by direct inspection through the mouth. The recurrent nerves in the dog are easily accessible and may be anastomosed to the vagus, the phrenic, the descending hypoglossal or to any one of the branches from the cervical plexus. If the involuntary and rhythmic respiratory movements of the vocal cords are dependent on the central connections of the recurrent and superior laryngeal nerves, experimental proof of this fact might be obtained by division of these nerves in the neck and the

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