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Article
March 1926

THE EFFECT OF THE SYMPATHETIC NERVOUS SYSTEM ON THE PERIPHERAL VASCULAR SYSTEM: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the department of surgery, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1926;12(3):760-768. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1926.01130030144006
Abstract

Following the impetus given periarterial sympathectomy by Leriche1 in 1913, when he first began to use the procedure extensively, the literature has become progressively more abundant with case reports and speculations as to its benefits. Leriche, however, can scarcely be given credit for originating the procedure, as Jaboulay in 1889 performed the identical operation but did not report it. Jaboulay in turn had obtained the idea from the well known work of Bernard,2 who showed the influence of the sympathetic nervous system on the circulation of blood in the ear of a rabbit. Since 1914 there has been so much written on the subject that even the occasional reader is well informed concerning the diversified pathologic conditions for which it has been advocated, either as a cure or as a form of symptomatic relief. It has been used for trophic neuroses, scleroderma, acro-asphyxia, acroparasthesias, trophic ulcers, Raynaud's disease,

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