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Article
January 1927

PRIMARY MALIGNANT TUMORS OF THE LONG BONES: END-RESULTS IN ONE HUNDRED AND SEVENTY OPERABLE CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Bone Sarcoma, Memorial Hospital, and the Hospital for Ruptured and Crippled.

Arch Surg. 1927;14(1):63-141. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130130067005
Abstract

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —Recurrent spindle cell sarcoma of tibia; amputation advised by other surgeons; treated with toxins alone; patient well, with a normal limb, at present, twenty-six and one-half years later.W. F., a man, aged 27, first noticed a swelling of the left tibia at the junction of the middle and upper thirds in March, 1897; this slowly increased in size and, July 28, he was operated on by Dr. Stewart of Toronto, Canada. A prompt recurrence took place and, November 25 of the same year, a second operation was performed, consisting in incision and curetting of the bone; the tissue was sent to Dr. John Caven, professor of pathology, University of Toronto, who pronounced it a spindle cell sarcoma. The tumor again recurred, and the patient was referred to us for toxin treatment in February, 1899.Physical examination at this time showed a tumor at about

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