[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1927

LEUKEMIA—A SARCOMA: BONE EVIDENCEREPORT OF TWO CASES

Arch Surg. 1927;14(2):542-553. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130140087003
Abstract

The etiology of leukemia is still uncertain. To me it resembles sarcoma in a fluid medium. It acts like a malignant growth clinically. In the two cases I report, the morbid anatomy and histologic pathology indicate it to be of a sarcomatous nature. Not only do the leukemic cells invade soft parts, but the bone likewise gives evidence of destructive action of cells and fluids. Since the original suggestion of Bizzozero, many have thought it might be sarcomatous.

Osler1 in his Principles and Practice of Medicine writes of Willcock's case, "where there were growths on the stomach and gastrosplenic omentum, leukemic infiltration of the liver, the cells being outside the capillaries." He furthermore states, "Leukemic tumors may occur in the kidneys and liver." "Bizzozero showed these tumor cells to be in active fission." "Occasionally the sternum, ribs and flat bones show great irregularity and deformity owing to the definite

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×