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Article
March 1927

EXPERIMENTAL CHRONIC DUODENAL OBSTRUCTION: I. TECHNIC AND PHYSIOLOGY

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Pathology and Surgery, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University.

Arch Surg. 1927;14(3):752-761. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130150133004
Abstract

There is a growing tendency on the part of clinicians to believe that many obscure and indefinite symptoms are due to the absorption of toxins from the intestinal tract. It is on this hypothesis that high colonic irrigations, bacterial implantations, etc., have been recommended in certain diseases. In addition, some of the more serious conditions, such as pernicious anemia, have been attributed to intestinal intoxication. Though the belief that these hypothetical toxins are produced in the intestinal tract has been prevalent for years, little direct evidence has been brought forward to support the idea. It was in the hope that we might learn something more definite that the following experiments were conducted.

Since the symptoms and diseases that have been attributed to the absorption of toxins from the intestinal tract are characterized by their chronicity, we produced and studied experimental lesions existing for a prolonged period. In our first study

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