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Article
September 1927

ROENTGEN-RAY TREATMENT OF TUBERCULOUS CERVICAL LYMPH GLANDS: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND FORTY-ONE PATIENTS TREATED BY SMALL DOSES OF FILTERED ROENTGEN RAY, WITH FOLLOW-UP RESULTS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of Columbia University, College of Physicians and Surgeons, and of the Presbyterian Hospital, New York.

Arch Surg. 1927;15(3):377-396. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130210062003
Abstract

Roentgen discovered the "X" or unknown rays at Würzberg in 1895. The active or chemical powers of the rays were first recognized through the destructive burns received by the numerous new experimenters. The burns at once suggested the possibility of a new agent for the destruction of morbid tissues, notably those of the skin, including tuberculosis.

In 1902, Dawson Turner,1 medical head of the electrical department of the Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, published the third edition of his "Manual of Practical Medical Electricity." On page 376, under the subheading, "Enlarged Tubercular Glands," he writes:

"Six cases of enlarged tubercular glands have been under roentgen-ray treatment in the Electrical Department of the Royal Infirmary. The exposures have been of five minutes duration, three times a week. The duration of the disease has varied from thirteen years to three months. In some of the older cases, many operations had been performed and

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