[Skip to Navigation]
[Skip to Navigation Landing]
Article
October 1927

MALIGNANT TUMORS OF THE TESTICLE: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO CLASSIFICATION

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Surgery, New York Postgraduate Hospital; Adjunct Visiting Surgeon, Fourth Division, Bellevue Hospital NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery, New York Postgraduate Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1927;15(4):530-541. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130220033002
Abstract

Invasion of the testicle by neoplastic disease is notably uncommon as compared to its occurrence in other parts of the body; explicitly, malignant tumors of this organ constitute less than 3 per cent of all the malignant growths encountered throughout the human body.

Despite this rarity, however, the unique and unusual features which characterize and distinguish these tumors, both structurally and clinically, have focused on them a degree of interest and study in striking disproportion to their observed incidence and have established their importance in medical literature.

Clinically, this condition is usually conceived of as a solid tumor of the testicle, often static for a considerable period, but eventually presenting characteristics of slow local growth, which is finally expressed as widespread general metastases. Variations from this sequence are not infrequently seen, however. The disease may be met first in the form of metastatic tumors of the brain, lung and abdomen

×