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Article
November 1927

ACUTE TRAUMATIC ULCERS OF THE SMALL INTESTINE: OBSERVATIONS ON THE EFFECTS OF APPLICATION OF CLAMPS ON THE GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT: AN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO
From the Seymour Coman Fellowship in the Department of Physiology of the University of Chicago, and the Department of Surgery of Rush Medical College of the University of Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1927;15(5):689-711. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1927.01130230025003
Abstract

It is generally recognized that trauma may be an important contributing factor in the genesis of chronic peptic ulcer. However, opinions differ regarding the influence of clamps as a source of trauma in gastro-intestinal operations and the relation of this form of trauma to chronic jejunal and experimental ulcers. A study of this problem was undertaken that more definite knowledge might be obtained of the nature and extent of the injury produced by clamps. The questions that I have endeavored to answer are: Do acute ulcers occur from pressure, and if so, do these ulcers become chronic? What is the influence of the nutritional state of the animal on the production and healing of these lesions? What is the effect of injury from clamps on those parts of the intestinal tract free from peptic activity?

LITERATURE  The first postoperative jejunal ulcer was reported by Braun1 in 1899. Since then

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