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Article
January 1928

COLLAPSE FOLLOWING SUDDEN DECOMPRESSION OF THE DISTENDED ABDOMEN: A STUDY IN EXPERIMENTAL ASCITES

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(1):144-152. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140010148009
Abstract

In tapping the abdomen of the patient with marked ascites, the necessity for caution in removing the fluid slowly is well known. To obviate the collapse of the patient consequent on the too rapid removal of the transudate, a Scultetus bandage or a binder is frequently placed around the abdomen at the start and is tightened as the fluid is removed. The same prudence in performing paracentesis of the pleural cavity is a matter of every-day practice. On consulting a large number of modern surgical texts, we have been unable to find a word of caution in this regard in the matter of incising the distended abdomen. In discussing the subject with several of our preceptors and colleagues, however, we find that most of them know of or have had personal experience with instances in which collapse followed directly on the sudden decompression of the distended abdomen by incision. The

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