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Article
January 1928

PERSISTENT NONTUBERCULOUS PNEUMOTHORAX: REPORT OF TWO CASES: ONE OF TEN YEAR'S DURATION; THE OTHER OF MORE THAN ONE YEAR'S DURATION

Author Affiliations

Professor of Roentgenology, New York University NEW YORK

Arch Surg. 1928;16(1):426-430. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140010430028
Abstract

It has been recognized for a number of years that there is a form of nontuberculous spontaneous pneumothorax.1 It is generally believed that these patients make a prompt recovery with complete expansion of the collapsed lung within a few weeks. Such, however, is not always the case, so that it appears desirable to report two cases in which expansion of the lung did not occur in the usual manner. In one case the collapse persisted for slightly more than a year, and in another case the lung has failed to expand after eleven years, and apparently the collapse is permanent.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —M. V., a woman, aged 77, first noticed acute symptoms on Nov. 8, 1916, following an attack of bronchitis. Roentgen-ray examination showed spontaneous localized pneumothorax involving the upper two thirds of the right side of the chest. Roentgenograms were made at intervals over a

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