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Article
March 1928

SUBCUTANEOUS INJURIES OF THE ABDOMINAL VISCERA: ANATOMIC AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Medical Examiner's Office of New York City, the First Surgical Division of Bellevue Hospital and the Surgical Service of the Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(3):631-679. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140030003001
Abstract

Two types of lesions are produced by physical violence on the abdominal cavity and its organs. The first is represented by stab wounds and bullet wounds, which penetrate the skin and leave characteristic external marks. They are known as percutaneous injuries. The second type is due to the action of nonpenetrating blunt force, which traumatizes the abdominal viscera but which may or may not leave marks on the surface of the skin. These are called subcutaneous injuries. Of the two, the second variety offers more difficult problems in diagnosis and treatment than the first. While the percutaneous wound can scarcely be overlooked because of the penetration of the skin, the subcutaneous injury often lacks external indications and frequently is not noticed on examination. As many of these injuries are dangerous, though not necessarily hopeless if the patient is given prompt treatment, their early detection is a matter of grave importance

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