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Article
May 1928

METASTATIC OPHTHALMIA: SUBACUTE ENDOCARDITIS COMPLICATED BY METASTATIC OPHTHALMIA AND MENINGITIS; DISTRIBUTION OF GENTIAN VIOLET SOLUTION SIX AND ONE-HALF HOURS AFTER INJECTION INTO CISTERNA MAGNA. REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO
From the Department of Ophthalmology, Stanford University Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(5):1000-1006. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140050024002
Abstract

Metastatic ophthalmia usually means an inflammation of the eyeball, resulting from some endogenous infection. This inflammation takes place through an embolus; septic material from some focus of suppuration enters the circulation and becomes lodged in the choroidal vessels. The cases vary; the infection may be mild, a small degree of sight being retained, or, as in cases of severe infection, the condition may resemble panophthalmitis. One or both eyes may be affected. According to Fuchs,1 in rare instances, this condition may occur in acute infectious diseases, such as typhus and typhoid fever, variola, scarlet fever, anthrax, influenza, ulcerative endocarditis, diphtheria, erysipelas, pneumonia and Weil's disease. Metastatic ophthalmia is produced either by ordinary germs, among which the streptococci rank first and the pneumococci second, or by bacteria which are specific for certain definite diseases (e.g., the meningococcus, the pneumobacillus, the influenza bacillus, the typhoid bacillus or other bacteria). A mixed

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