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Article
June 1928

MÉNIÈRE'S DISEASE: ITS DIAGNOSIS AND A METHOD OF TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Surgical Department of Johns Hopkins Hospital and University.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(6):1127-1152. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140060002001
Abstract

The purpose of this communication is to present the results of an operation which I believe will permanently cure the symptoms of Ménière's disease. Briefly stated, the treatment is section of the auditory nerve intracranially. It is attended with almost no risk of life, and since there is always subtotal deafness on the affected side before the operation, section of the nerve adds little of practical importance to the deafness. Other symptoms do not result when the auditory nerve is severed.

In its usual form, Ménière's disease has a well defined and well recognized symptom complex. The patient is suddenly seized with a violent attack of dizziness, at once associated with nausea, vomiting and unilateral tinnitus referred to an ear which is progressively growing deafer. These attacks are repeated from time to time, usually with increasing frequency. The patients are well between the attacks, though eventually they may recur so

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