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Article
June 1928

USE OF INTRA-ARTERIAL INJECTIONS OF SODIUM IODIDE IN DETERMINING CONDITION OF CIRCULATION IN THE EXTREMITIES: REPORT OF CASES

Author Affiliations

GALVESTON, TEX.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(6):1232-1241. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140060107007
Abstract

Impairment of the circulation in the extremities due to diseased blood vessels, which results in gangrene and the symptoms accompanying it, is of ever growing importance. The conditions responsible for these failures of circulation may be considered as aneurysms of various types and obstructions to the arteries and veins. The acute obstructions may be due to emboli or thrombi obstructing important vessels, the result of which may be gangrene if either the arterial or venous blocking is sufficiently complete. The more chronic types of gangrene are the result of arterial disease, and clinically and pathologically, these are recognized as: (1) the arteriosclerotic type which embraces senile and diabetic gangrene, (2) thrombo-angiitis obliterans (Buerger's disease) and (3) arterial spasm (Raynaud's disease).

Each of these three types of disease of the blood vessels differs distinctly in its pathologic changes. In the arteriosclerotic type, the entire arterial system is involved, the capillaries and

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