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Article
June 1928

STUDIES IN INTESTINAL OBSTRUCTION: III. SIMPLE OBSTRUCTION: A STUDY OF THE CAUSE OF DEATH IN MECHANICAL OBSTRUCTION OF THE UPPER PART OF THE INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
From the Department of Surgery of the University of Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1928;16(6):1242-1255. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140060117008
Abstract

There are two fairly distinct types of intestinal obstruction, clinically as well as experimentally; in one the continuity of the intestinal canal has been interrupted; in the other gross evidence of damage to the obstructed segment exists in addition to a break in the continuity of the tract. These forms have aptly been described as simple and strangulation obstruction.1

Early clinicians and investigators thought that in simple occlusion of the bowel, the wall became permeable to bacteria in the intestine, and peritonitis and bacterial invasion of the organism brought about a lethal outcome.2 Such a contention has been set aside by subsequent investigation, as well as by the frequent opening of the abdomen, under aseptic conditions of both patients and dogs with obstruction.

Amussat3 is generally looked on as being the originator of the intoxication theory for the explanation of symptoms and death in intestinal obstruction. This

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