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Article
September 1928

THE RÔLE OF THE CIRCULATION IN THE HEALING OF FRACTURES: A REVIEW

Author Affiliations

PITTSBURGH

Arch Surg. 1928;17(3):420-429. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140090067003
Abstract

Normal Blood Supply of Bone.

Effect of a Fracture on the Adjacent Arterial Circulation.

Effect of Cutting the Veins and Lymphatics at the Site of Fracture.

Incompressibility of Muscle Tissue and the Effect of This on the Circulation of Blood to a Fracture Area.

Relation of the New Bone Trabeculae to Blood Vessels.

The Laying Down of Lime Salts.

Development of Fibrous Tissue.

Summary.

Conclusions.

In 1863, Hamilton1 estimated the incidence of nonunion of fractures to be one in 500 cases. Scudder and Hey-Groves,2 in 1927, placed it, respectively, at from 2 to 3 and from 3 to 5 per cent. If it is true, but this is doubtful, that there is a larger percentage of delayed unions and nonunion of fractures today than formerly, it may easily be accounted for by the greater traumatisms sustained today and by the more exacting standards under which the surgeon works,

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