[Skip to Navigation]
Article
September 1928

SPONTANEOUS DISLOCATION AND DESTRUCTION OF TENDON OF LONG HEAD OF BICEPS BRACHII: FIFTY-NINE INSTANCES

Author Affiliations

PALO ALTO, CALIF.
From the Department of Anatomy, Stanford University.

Arch Surg. 1928;17(3):493-506. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1928.01140090140010
Abstract

In bringing these two conditions together in the title, I am not assuming that they necessarily are always associated and that every case of destruction of this tendon necessarily was first one of dislocation. In most cases, however, dislocation of the tendon probably leads to greater wear, but, as reported previously,1 tendons still lying in a normal position and in otherwise normal shoulder joints may show considerable wear.

Since the biceps as well as other muscles may be congenitally absent, it follows that the tendon of either head may also be absent congenitally, but it is improbable that all the statements in the literature on this matter can be taken at their face value. I never have seen a clear case of congenital absence of the long head since I have understood the condition better, and few of those reported in the literature, including my own,2 are absolutely

×