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Article
January 1, 1929

THE RELATIONSHIP OF THE HEART AND LUNGS IN DISEASE

Arch Surg. 1929;18(1_PART_II):339-348. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.04420020161012

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Abstract

The relationship of the heart and lungs in disease is an important and interesting, though often neglected, study. These vital organs are more intimately associated than most other structures in the body, for not only are they interdependent functionally, but they are actually in contact anatomically, only the delicate tissue of the pleura and pericardium separating them. Thus not only will derangement of function of one organ affect the other if of sufficient magnitude, but disease or disturbance of structure of the one is apt to spread by contact to the other, or at least to displace it. It is to be remembered that the heart is, strictly speaking, a mediastinal organ along with its great vessels while the lungs are the structures that flank it on both sides, filling the chest proper. Associated with the fact that the heart lies more to the left than to the right of

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