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Article
March 1, 1929

A REVIEW OF UROLOGIC SURGERY

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES; ROCHESTER, MINN.; ROANOKE, VA.; TORONTO; ANTWERP, BELGIUM; LOS ANGELES

Arch Surg. 1929;18(3):913-934. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.04420040146014
Abstract

KIDNEY  Surgical Technic.—Pérard1 stated that fistulas are rather common following operations on the kidney and renal pelvis. To avoid a pusproducing fistula after operation on tuberculous kidneys, the ureter should be anchored to the skin. If a fistula should occur, it may be destroyed by the use of cauterizing agents. Certain fistulas cause large, deep, pus cavities which must be opened and healed by the use of tampons. Fistulas following ordinary pyogenic infections are quite rare and generally, if they do not respond to treatment, are due to the presence of a foreign body. Fistulas due to perinephritic abscesses continue if drainage is poor. Treatment consists of opening the abscess wide and breaking down any pockets that may be present. Urinary and pus fistulas can then persist only if there is a stone in the kidney, pelvis or ureter, or if there is ureteral obstruction in cases of hydronephrosis.Urinary

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