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Article
April 1929

THE ABILITY TO LOCALIZE SOUND: A STUDY OF BINAURAL HEARING IN PATIENTS WITH TUMOR OF THE BRAIN

Author Affiliations

From the Surgical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1929;18(4):1825-1841. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01140130927061
Abstract

I. THE NATURE OF BINAURAL HEARING  Binocular vision gives a perception of distance through the coördination in the brain of sensations coming from the two retinas and the two sets of ocular muscles. In a somewhat comparable way, one determines whether a sound comes from the right or left side by the coordination of sensations coming from the ears. In other words, the lateral localization of sound1 is a result of binaural hearing.A clear understanding of two terms is essential for following a discussion of the subject, and these terms will be briefly explained. In figure 1, D represents the head of a listener seen from above. R and L are his right and left ears. B is the position of a sound. The segments of concentric circles represent sound waves.The listener, D, knows that the sound is on his right side, for two reasons. In the

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