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Article
December 1929

FIBROMA OF THE VULVA CONTAINING AN EPITHELIAL INCLUSION CYST

Arch Surg. 1929;19(6):1061-1071. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01150060123005
Abstract

Fibromas arising from the external genitalia in women are by no means common. In a study of 5,000 gynecologic cases tabulated at the Michigan University Hospital, in 1905, Burr1 did not find a single case of vulvar fibroma. In 1917, Leonard2 was able to find records of only six such tumors among the 23,000 patients admitted to the gynecologic department of the Johns Hopkins Hospital. Up to the present time, less than 175 fibromas of the vulva have been reported in all medical literature.

The majority of these growths arise in the subcutaneous connective tissue, but quite a large group of them originate in the extraperitoneal portion of the round ligament. It has long been known that the round ligament of the uterus, after traversing the entire length of the inguinal canal, emerges from the external inguinal ring and ends by breaking up into a number of diverging

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