[Skip to Navigation]
Article
December 1929

DEMONSTRATIONS OF EXPERIMENTAL WORK IN THE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MEDICINE: 9. COMPARISON OF IODIZED OIL AND BROMINIZED OIL

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS
From the Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, and Barnes Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1929;19(6):1660-1662. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1929.01150060722040
Abstract

The use of a brominized oil as a contrast medium in roentgenology has been suggested in order to overcome certain dangers which are supposed to be inherent in iodized oils. Several manufacturers have made preparations of brominized oil and have put them out under various names. Our experience with this type of oil has been limited but sufficient to give us certain impressions.

In view of the fact that other investigators have made statements that iodized oil is likely to produce an aggravation of symptoms and signs in tuberculous patients, we thought it advisable to review our statistics to determine whether we could substantiate this. During the routine work in our chest service, 277 patients have received intratracheal injections of iodized oil (lipiodol). Thirty-five of these were cases of chronic pulmonary tuberculosis. Three patients, none of them tuberculous, developed definite symptoms and signs of iodism, but all of them had

×